KS3 BIOLOGY QUIZZES

Doc B's revising for KS3 SCIENCE

 Doc Brown's KS3 BIOLOGY

I appreciate SAT levels have gone, but I hope these KS3 biology Quizzes will still be of some use. Although I've already produced some combined KS3 biology quizzes, I welcome suggestions from teachers so I may produce useful compilation KS3 biology quizzes suitable for any school doing KS3 biology and any KS3 biology scheme of work now that the KS3 biology levels and KS3 biology SAT exams have gone.

Copying of the KS3 biology quizzes is NOT permitted but you can printout the KS3 biology questions to use in class or for homework.


GCSE 9-1 Chemistry Notes  *  GCSE 9-1 Biology Notes  *  GCSE 9-1 Physics Notes



The KS3 Biology Multiple Choice Questions

The KS3 Biology Questions are selected at random from big databases.

PLEASE NOTE: (1) <= back on the link bar of the quiz returns you to the previous web page.

(2) Don't use the usual refresh button on the upper browser to repeat the quiz, use the    REPEAT QUIZ - fresh Q's    on the quiz link bar.

(3) A small proportion questions are deliberately very challenging and more like GCSE level, but only the odd one! and most cover the full range of ability of KS3 science students.


10 Q multiple choice question KS3 Science-BIOLOGY quizzes

  1. KS3 Biology Quiz - 7AQUIZ 7A on "Cells" Questions on types of plant and animal cells, idea of plant and animal organs, functions of cells

  2. KS3 Biology Quiz - 7B ReproductionQUIZ 7B on "Reproduction" Questions on human reproductive organs, sperm/egg cells, fertilisation, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, birth

  3. KS3 Biology Quiz - 7C Environment & feeding relationshipsQUIZ 7C on "Environment & feeding relationships" Questions on different environments and habitats, food chains, adaptations

  4. KS3 Biology Quiz - 7D Variation and classificationQUIZ 7D on "Variation and classification" Questions on classification/differences - plants, animals, vertebrates and invertebrates

  5. KS3 Biology Quiz - 8A Food and digestionQUIZ 8A on "Food and digestion" Questions on the importance of food, types of food in a balanced diet, the digestive system, action of acid/alkali/enzymes in breaking down food

  6. KS3 Biology Quiz - 8B RespirationQUIZ 8B on "Respiration" Questions on link between digestion and respiration, chemistry of respiration, transport of substances involved in respiration, function of the lungs

  7. KS3 Biology Quiz - 8C Microbes and diseasesQUIZ 8C on "Microbes and diseases" Questions on micro-organisms, function of yeast, causes of disease, prevention/cure of disease, the bodies defence systems, medicines and immunisation

  8. KS3 Biology Quiz - 8D Ecological relationshipsQUIZ 8D on "Ecological relationships" Questions on food webs, population changes e.g. predator-prey relationship, pyramid of numbers

  9. KS3 Biology Quiz - 9A Inheritance and selectionQUIZ 9A on "Inheritance and selection" Questions on inherited characteristics, effect of environment on characteristics, variation in offspring, selective breeding for particular character, cloning

  10. KS3 Biology Quiz - 9B Fit and healthyQUIZ 9B on "Fit and healthy" Questions on the respiratory system, respiration chemistry, fitness levels, importance of diet, effects of drugs and alcohol, how healthy are we?

  11. KS3 Biology Quiz - 9C Plants and photosynthesisQUIZ 9C on "Plants and photosynthesis" Questions on function of the parts of plants, how they grow, role of leaves and photosynthesis chemistry, environmental importance of plants

  12. KS3 Biology Quiz - 9D Plants for foodQUIZ 9D on "Plants for food" Questions on food sources, uses of fertilisers and pesticides, competition for resources between plants, what are the best growing conditions for plants?


SEE ALSO the KS3 Science Quiz compilations

20 Q m/c QUIZ on  ORGANISMS, BEHAVIOUR and HEALTH

20 Q multiple choice QUIZ on CHEMICAL, MATERIAL BEHAVIOUR

20 Q multiple choice QUIZ on ENERGY, ELECTRICITY, FORCES

20 Q multiple choice QUIZ on ENVIRONMENT, EARTH, UNIVERSE


National Curriculum KS3 Science BIOLOGY specification

Subject content – KS3 Biology Pupils should be taught about:

KS3 biology Structure and function of living organisms

KS3 biology Cells and organisation     (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

cells as the fundamental unit of living organisms, including how to observe, interpret and record cell structure using a light microscope

the functions of the cell wall, cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondria and chloroplasts,

the similarities and differences between plant and animal cells,

the role of diffusion in the movement of materials in and between cells

the structural adaptations of some unicellular organisms

the hierarchical organisation of multicellular organisms: from cells to tissues to organs to systems to organisms.

KS3 biology The skeletal and muscular systems     (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

the structure and functions of the human skeleton, to include support, protection, movement and making blood cells

biomechanics – the interaction between skeleton and muscles, including the measurement of force exerted by different muscles

the function of muscles and examples of antagonistic muscles.

KS3 biology Nutrition and digestion      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

content of a healthy human diet: carbohydrates, lipids (fats and oils), proteins, vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and water, and why each is needed

calculations of energy requirements in a healthy daily diet

the consequences of imbalances in the diet, including obesity, starvation and deficiency diseases

the tissues and organs of the human digestive system, including adaptations to function and how the digestive system digests food (enzymes simply as biological catalysts)

the importance of bacteria in the human digestive system

plants making carbohydrates in their leaves by photosynthesis and gaining mineral nutrients and water from the soil via their roots.

KS3 biology Gas exchange systems      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

the structure and functions of the gas exchange system in humans, including adaptations to function

the mechanism of breathing to move air in and out of the lungs, using a pressure model to explain the movement of gases, including simple measurements of lung volume

the impact of exercise, asthma and smoking on the human gas exchange system

the role of leaf stomata in gas exchange in plants.

KS3 biology Reproduction      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

reproduction in humans (as an example of a mammal), including the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, menstrual cycle (without details of hormones), gametes, fertilisation, gestation and birth, to include the effect of maternal lifestyle on the foetus through the placenta

reproduction in plants, including flower structure, wind and insect pollination, fertilisation, seed and fruit formation and dispersal, including quantitative investigation of some dispersal mechanisms.

KS3 biology Health      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

the effects of recreational drugs (including substance misuse) on behaviour, health and life processes.
Material cycles and energy

KS3 biology Photosynthesis       (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

the reactants in, and products of, photosynthesis, and a word summary for photosynthesis

the dependence of almost all life on Earth on the ability of photosynthetic organisms, such as plants and algae, to use sunlight in photosynthesis to build organic molecules that are an essential energy store and to maintain levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere

the adaptations of leaves for photosynthesis.

KS3 biology Cellular respiration     (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

aerobic and anaerobic respiration in living organisms, including the breakdown of organic molecules to enable all the other chemical processes necessary for life

a word summary for aerobic respiration

the process of anaerobic respiration in humans and micro-organisms, including fermentation, and a word summary for anaerobic respiration

the differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration in terms of the reactants, the products formed and the implications for the organism.

KS3 biology Interactions and interdependencies      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

KS3 biology Relationships in an ecosystem     (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem, including food webs and insect pollinated crops

the importance of plant reproduction through insect pollination in human food security

how organisms affect, and are affected by, their environment, including the accumulation of toxic materials.

KS3 biology Genetics and evolution      (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

KS3 biology Inheritance, chromosomes, DNA and genes     (National Curriculum KS3 science-biology)

heredity as the process by which genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next

a simple model of chromosomes, genes and DNA in heredity, including the part played by Watson, Crick, Wilkins and Franklin in the development of the DNA mode

differences between species

the variation between individuals within a species being continuous or discontinuous, to include measurement and graphical representation of variation

the variation between species and between individuals of the same species means some organisms compete more successfully, which can drive natural selection

changes in the environment may leave individuals within a species, and some entire species, less well adapted to compete successfully and reproduce, which in turn may lead to extinction

the importance of maintaining biodiversity and the use of gene banks to preserve hereditary material.
 


AQA KS3 Science BIOLOGY specification

Subject content – KS3 Biology Pupils should be taught about:

AQA KS3 biology 3.8 Organisms

AQA KS3 biology 3.8.1 Movement

Explore how the skeletal system and muscular system in a chicken wing work together to cause movement

AQA KS3 biology Know

The parts of the human skeleton work as a system for support, protection, movement and the production of new blood cells.

Antagonistic pairs of muscles create movement when one contracts and the other relaxes.

Keywords

Joints: Places where bones meet.

Bone marrow: Tissue found inside some bones where new blood cells are made.

Ligaments: Connect bones in joints.

Tendons: Connect muscles to bones.

Cartilage: Smooth tissue found at the end of bones, which reduces friction between them.

Antagonistic muscle pair: Muscles working in unison to create movement.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Explain how a physical property of part of the skeleton relates to its function.

Explain why some organs contain muscle tissue.

Explain how antagonistic muscles produce movement around a joint.

Use a diagram to predict the result of a muscle contraction or relaxation.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Predict the consequences of damage to a joint, bone or muscle.

Suggest factors that affect the force exerted by different muscles.

Consider the benefits and risks of a technology for improving human movement.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.8.2 Cells

AQA KS3 biology Identify the principal features of a cheek cell and describe their functions

AQA KS3 biology Know

Multicellular organisms are composed of cells which are organised into tissues, organs and systems to carry out life processes.

There are many types of cell.

Each has a different structure or feature so it can do a specific job.

Skill Use a light microscope to observe and draw cells.

Facts

Both plant and animal cells have a cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria.

Plant cells also have a cell wall, chloroplasts and usually a permanent vacuole.

Keywords Cell:

The unit of a living organism, contains parts to carry out life processes.

Uni-cellular: Living things made up of one cell.

Multi-cellular: Living things made up of many types of cell.

Tissue: Group of cells of one type.

Organ: Group of different tissues working together to carry out a job.

Diffusion: One way for substances to move into and out of cells.

Structural adaptations: Special features to help a cell carry out its functions.

Cell membrane: Surrounds the cell and controls movement of substances in and out.

Nucleus: Contains genetic material (DNA) which controls the cell’s activities.

Vacuole: Area in a cell that contains liquid, and can be used by plants to keep the cell rigid and store substances.

Mitochondria: Part of the cell where energy is released from food molecules.

Cell wall: Strengthens the cell. In plant cells it is made of cellulose.

Chloroplast: Absorbs light energy so the plant can make food.

Cytoplasm: Jelly-like substance where most chemical processes happen.

Immune system: Protects the body against infections.

Reproductive system: Produces sperm and eggs, and is where the foetus develops.

Digestive system: Breaks down and then absorbs food molecules.

Circulatory system: Transports substances around the body.

Respiratory system: Replaces oxygen and removes carbon dioxide from blood.

Muscular skeletal system: Muscles and bones working together to cause movement and support the body.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Explain why multi-cellular organisms need organ systems to keep their cells alive.

Suggest what kind of tissue or organism a cell is part of, based on its features.

Explain how to use a microscope to identify and compare different types of cells.

Explain how uni-cellular organisms are adapted to carry out functions that in multi-cellular organisms are done by different types of cell.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Make deductions about how medical treatments work based on cells, tissues, organs and systems.

Suggest how damage to, or failure of, an organ would affect other body systems.

Deduce general patterns about how the structure of different cells is related to their function.

Find out how recreational drugs might affect different body systems.

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.8.3 Breathing

AQA KS3 biology Investigate a claim linking height to lung volume

AQA KS3 biology Know

In gas exchange, oxygen and carbon dioxide move between alveoli and the blood.

Oxygen is transported to cells for aerobic respiration and carbon dioxide, a waste product of respiration, is removed from the body.

Breathing occurs through the action of muscles in the ribcage and diaphragm.

The amount of oxygen required by body cells determines the rate of breathing.

Keywords

Breathing: The movement of air in and out of the lungs.

Trachea (windpipe): Carries air from the mouth and nose to the lungs.

Bronchi: Two tubes which carry air to the lungs.

Bronchioles: Small tubes in the lung.

Alveoli: Small air sacs found at the end of each bronchiole.

Ribs: Bones which surround the lungs to form the ribcage.

Diaphragm: A sheet of muscle found underneath the lungs.

Lung volume: Measure of the amount of air breathed in or out.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Explain how exercise, smoking and asthma affect the gas exchange system.

Explain how the parts of the gas exchange system are adapted to their function.

Explain observations about changes to breathing rate and volume.

Explain how changes in volume and pressure inside the chest move gases in and out of the lungs.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Evaluate a possible treatment for a lung disease.

Predict how a change in the gas exchange system could affect other processes in the body.

Evaluate a model for showing the mechanism of breathing.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.8.4 Digestion

Evaluate how well a model represents key features of the digestive system

AQA KS3 biology Know

The body needs a balanced diet with carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and water, for its cells’ energy, growth and maintenance.

Organs of the digestive system are adapted to break large food molecules into small ones which can travel in the blood to cells and are used for life processes.

Facts

Iron is a mineral important for red blood cells.

Calcium is a mineral needed for strong teeth and bones.

Vitamins and minerals are needed in small amounts to keep the body healthy.

Keywords

Enzymes: Substances that speed up the chemical reactions of digestion.

Dietary fibre: Parts of plants that cannot be digested, which helps the body eliminate waste.

Carbohydrates: The body’s main source of energy. There are two types: simple (sugars) and complex (starch).

Lipids (fats and oils): A source of energy. Found in butter, milk, eggs, nuts.

Protein: Nutrient your body uses to build new tissue for growth and repair. Sources are meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, beans, nuts and seeds.

Stomach: A sac where food is mixed with acidic juices to start the digestion of protein and kill microorganisms.

Small intestine: Upper part of the intestine where digestion is completed and nutrients are absorbed by the blood.

Large intestine: Lower part of the intestine from which water is absorbed and where faeces are formed.

Gut bacteria: Microorganisms that naturally live in the intestine and help food break down.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Describe possible health effects of unbalanced diets from data provided.

Calculate food requirements for a healthy diet, using information provided.

Describe how organs and tissues involved in digestion are adapted for their role.

Describe the events that take place in order to turn a meal into simple food molecules inside a cell.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Design a diet for a person with specific dietary needs.

Critique claims for a food product or diet by analysing nutritional information.

Make deductions from medical symptoms showing problems with the digestive system.
 

AQA KS3 biology 3.9 Ecosystems

AQA KS3 biology 3.9.1 Interdependence

Use a model to investigate the impact of changes in a population of one organism on others in the ecosystem

AQA KS3 biology Know

Organisms in a food web (decomposers, producers and consumers) depend on each other for nutrients.

So, a change in one population leads to changes in others.

The population of a species is affected by the number of its predators and prey, disease, pollution and competition between individuals for limited resources such as water and nutrients.

Fact Insects are needed to pollinate food crops.

Keywords

Food web: Shows how food chains in an ecosystem are linked.

Food chain: Part of a food web, starting with a producer, ending with a top predator.

Ecosystem: The living things in a given area and their non-living environment.

Environment: The surrounding air, water and soil where an organism lives.

Population: Group of the same species living in an area.

Producer: Green plant or algae that makes its own food using sunlight.

Consumer: Animal that eats other animals or plants.

Decomposer: Organism that breaks down dead plant and animal material so nutrients can be recycled back to the soil or water.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Describe how a species’ population changes as its predator or prey population changes.

Explain effects of environmental changes and toxic materials on a species’ population.

Combine food chains to form a food web.

Explain issues with human food supplies in terms of insect pollinators.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Suggest what might happen when an unfamiliar species is introduced into a food web.

Develop an argument about how toxic substances can accumulate in human food.

Make a deduction based on data about what caused a change in the population of a species.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.9.2 Plant reproduction

Use models to evaluate the features of various types of seed dispersal

AQA KS3 biology Know

Plants have adaptations to disperse seeds using wind, water or animals.

Plants reproduce sexually to produce seeds, which are formed following fertilisation in the ovary.

Facts

Flowers contain the plant’s reproductive organs.

Pollen can be carried by the wind, pollinating insects or other animals.

Keywords

Pollen: Contains the plant male sex cells found on the stamens.

Ovules: Female sex cells in plants found in the ovary.

Pollination: Transfer of pollen from the male part of the flower to the female part of the flower on the same or another plant.

Fertilisation: Joining of a nucleus from a male and female sex cell.

Seed: Structure that contains the embryo of a new plant.

Fruit: Structure that the ovary becomes after fertilisation, which contains seeds.

Carpel: The female part of the flower, made up of the stigma where the pollen lands, style and ovary.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Describe the main steps that take place when a plant reproduces successfully.

Identify parts of the flower and link their structure to their function.

Suggest how a plant carried out seed dispersal based on the features of its fruit or seed.

Explain why seed dispersal is important to survival of the parent plant and its offspring.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Describe similarities and differences between the structures of wind pollinated and insect pollinated plants.

Suggest how plant breeders use knowledge of pollination to carry out selective breeding.

Develop an argument why a particular plant structure increases the likelihood of successful production of offspring.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.9.3 Respiration

Use data from investigating fermentation with yeast to explore respiration

AQA KS3 biology Know

Respiration is a series of chemical reactions, in cells, that breaks down glucose to provide energy and form new molecules.

Most living things use aerobic respiration but switch to anaerobic respiration, which provides less energy, when oxygen is unavailable.

Fact Yeast fermentation is used in brewing and breadmaking.

Keywords

Aerobic respiration: Breaking down glucose with oxygen to release energy and producing carbon dioxide and water.

Anaerobic respiration (fermentation): Releasing energy from the breakdown of glucose without oxygen, producing lactic acid (in animals) and ethanol and carbon dioxide (in plants and microorganisms).

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Use word equations to describe aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

Explain how specific activities involve aerobic or anaerobic respiration.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Suggest how organisms living in different conditions use respiration to get their energy.

Describe similarities and differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.9.4 Photosynthesis

Use lab tests on variegated leaves to show that chlorophyll is essential for photosynthesis

AQA KS3 biology Know

Plants and algae do not eat, but use energy from light, together with carbon dioxide and water to make glucose (food) through photosynthesis.

They either use the glucose as an energy source, to build new tissue, or store it for later use.

Plants have specially-adapted organs that allow them to obtain resources needed for photosynthesis.

Fact Iodine is used to test for the presence of starch.

Keywords

Fertilisers: Chemicals containing minerals that plants need to build new tissues.

Photosynthesis: A process where plants and algae turn carbon dioxide and water into glucose and release oxygen.

Chlorophyll: Green pigment in plants and algae which absorbs light energy.

Stomata: Pores in the bottom of a leaf which open and close to let gases in and out.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Describe ways in which plants obtain resources for photosynthesis.

Explain why other organisms are dependent on photosynthesis.

Sketch a line graph to show how the rate of photosynthesis is affected by changing conditions.

Use a word equation to describe photosynthesis in plants and algae.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Suggest how particular conditions could affect plant growth.

Suggest reasons for particular adaptations of leaves, roots and stems.

Compare the movement of carbon dioxide and oxygen through stomata at different times of day.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.10 Genes

AQA KS3 biology 3.10.1 Variation

Graph data relating to variation and explain how it may lead to the survival of a species

AQA KS3 biology Know

There is variation between individuals of the same species.

Some variation is inherited, some is caused by the environment and some is a combination.

Variation between individuals is important for the survival of a species, helping it to avoid extinction in an always changing environment.

Keywords

Species: A group of living things that have more in common with each other than with other groups.

Variation: The differences within and between species.

Continuous variation: Where differences between living things can have any numerical value.

Discontinuous variation: Where differences between living things can only be grouped into categories.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Explain whether characteristics are inherited, environmental or both.

Plot bar charts or line graphs to show discontinuous or continuous variation data.

Explain how variation helps a particular species in a changing environment.

Explain how characteristics of a species are adapted to particular environmental conditions.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Predict implications of a change in the environment on a population.

Use the ideas of variation to explain why one species may adapt better than another to environmental change.

Critique a claim that a particular characteristic is inherited or environmental.
 

AQA KS3 biology 3.10.2 Human reproduction

Relate advice to pregnant women to ideas about transfer of substances to the embryo

AQA KS3 biology Know

The menstrual cycle prepares the female for pregnancy and stops if the egg is fertilised by a sperm.

The developing foetus relies on the mother to provide it with oxygen and nutrients, to remove waste and protect it against harmful substances.

Facts

The menstrual cycle lasts approximately 28 days.

If an egg is fertilised it settles into the uterus lining.

Keywords

Gamete: The male gamete (sex cell) in animals is a sperm, the female an egg.

Fertilisation: Joining of a nucleus from a male and female sex cell.

Ovary: Organ which contains eggs.

Testicle: Organ where sperm are produced.

Oviduct, or fallopian tube: Carries an egg from the ovary to the uterus and is where fertilisation occurs.

Uterus, or womb: Where a baby develops in a pregnant woman.

Ovulation: Release of an egg cell during the menstrual cycle, which may be met by a sperm.

Menstruation: Loss of the lining of the uterus during the menstrual cycle.

Reproductive system: All the male and female organs involved in reproduction.

Penis: Organ which carries sperm out of the male’s body.

Vagina: Where the penis enters the female’s body and sperm is received.

Foetus: The developing baby during pregnancy.

Gestation: Process where the baby develops during pregnancy.

Placenta: Organ that provides the foetus with oxygen and nutrients and removes waste substances.

Amniotic fluid: Liquid that surrounds and protects the foetus.

Umbilical cord: Connects the foetus to the placenta.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Explain whether substances are passed from the mother to the foetus or not.

Use a diagram to show stages in development of a foetus from the production of sex cells to birth.

Describe causes of low fertility in male and female reproductive systems.

Identify key events on a diagram of the menstrual cycle.

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Explain why pregnancy is more or less likely at certain stages of the menstrual cycle.

Make deductions about how contraception and fertility treatments work.

Predict the effect of cigarettes, alcohol or drugs on the developing foetus.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.10.3 Evolution

Review the evidence for theories about how a particular species went extinct

AQA KS3 biology Know

Natural selection is a theory that explains how species evolve and why extinction occurs.

Biodiversity is vital to maintaining populations.

Within a species variation helps against environment changes, avoiding extinction.

Within an ecosystem, having many different species ensures resources are available for other populations, like humans.

Keywords

Population: Group of organisms of the same kind living in the same place.

Natural selection: Process by which species change over time in response to environmental changes and competition for resources.

Extinct: When no more individuals of a species remain.

Biodiversity: The variety of living things. It is measured as the differences between individuals of the same species, or the number of different species in an ecosystem.

Competition: When two or more living things struggle against each other to get the same resource.

Evolution: Theory that the animal and plant species living today descended from species that existed in the past.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Use evidence to explain why a species has become extinct or adapted to changing conditions.

Evaluate whether evidence for a species changing over time supports natural selection.

Explain how a lack of biodiversity can affect an ecosystem.

Describe how preserving biodiversity can provide useful products and services for humans

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Predict and explain the changes in a population over time due to natural selection.

Suggest an explanation, based on data, for how a particular evolutionary change occurred.

Evaluate ways of preserving plant or animal material for future generations.
 

 

AQA KS3 biology 3.10.4 Inheritance

Model the inheritance of a specific trait and explore the variation in the offspring produced

AQA KS3 biology Know

Inherited characteristics are the result of genetic information, in the form of sections of DNA called genes, being transferred from parents to offspring during reproduction.

Chromosomes are long pieces of DNA which contain many genes.

Gametes, carrying half the total number of chromosomes of each parent, combine during fertilisation.

Facts

The DNA of every individual is different, except for identical twins.

There is more than one version of each gene eg different blood groups.

Keywords

Inherited characteristics: Features that are passed from parents to their offspring.

DNA: A molecule found in the nucleus of cells that contains genetic information.

Chromosomes: Thread-like structures containing tightly coiled DNA.

Gene: A section of DNA that determines an inherited characteristic.

AQA KS3 biology Apply

Use a diagram to show the relationship between DNA, chromosomes and genes.

Use a diagram to show how genes are inherited.

Explain how a change in the DNA (mutation) may affect an organism and its future offspring.

Explain why offspring from the same parents look similar but are not usually identical

AQA KS3 biology Extend

Suggest arguments for and against genetic modification.

Suggest benefits from scientists knowing all the genes in the human genome.

Determine how the number of chromosomes changes during cell division, production of sex cells and fertilisation.

Find out why scientists Watson, Crick and Franklin were so important.
 


OCR Twenty First Century Science knowledge and understanding expected before GCSE Biology

Chapter B1 You and your genes

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about genes and inheritance you should ...

know that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents

know that heredity is the process by which genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next

know that genetic information is stored in the nucleus

understand a simple model of chromosomes, genes and DNA

know about the part played by Watson, Crick, Wilkins and Franklin in the development of the DNA model

know about sexual reproduction in animals, including the role of gametes and the process of fertilisation

know about sexual and asexual reproduction in plants, including flower structures and the processes of pollination and fertilisation

 

Chapter B2 Keeping healthy

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about on health and disease you should ..

appreciate that good hygiene helps humans keep healthy

be able to identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood

appreciate the importance of bacteria in the human digestive system

know that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that a healthy human diet includes carbohydrates, lipids (fats and oils), proteins, vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and water

recall some of the consequences of imbalances in the diet, including obesity, starvation and deficiency diseases

recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function

recall some of the effects of recreational drugs (including substance misuse) on behaviour, health and life processes.
 

Chapter B3 Living together – food and ecosystems

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about food and ecosystems you should ...

understand the similarities and differences between plant and animal cells

know that some organisms make their own food using photosynthesis

know that photosynthesis in plant cells occurs in the chloroplasts

know the reactants in, and products of, photosynthesis, and be able to write a word summary

know that photosynthesis requires light

be familiar with the adaptations of leaves for photosynthesis, and the role of stomata in gas exchange

know that water and minerals enter a plant through the roots

know that molecules of a solute move through solvent, and through cell membranes, by diffusion

know that animals obtain their food from plants (and other animals that ate plants)

understand the difference between carnivores, herbivores and omnivores, and between producers and consumers

know that individuals of the same type living in the same place make up a population, and that all the interacting populations in an ecosystem make up the community

understand the use of food chains and food webs as models of the feeding relationships within a community

appreciate the interdependence of organisms in a community, including food webs, the breakdown and cycling of materials, and animals as pollinators

know that changes in an ecosystem can affect the survival of individuals and populations.

 

Chapter B4 Using food and controlling growth

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about on cellular respiration and growth you should ...

be familiar with the processes of aerobic and anaerobic respiration in living organisms, and fermentation in microorganisms, including word summaries of the reactions

be able to recall the differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration in terms of the reactants, products and implications for the organism

be familiar with the tissues and organs of the human digestive system, including adaptations to function

understand in simple terms that the human digestive system uses chemicals (including enzymes) to digest food

appreciate the importance of bacteria in the human digestive system

know how nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.

 

Chapter B5 The human body – staying alive

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about on the human body you should ...

appreciate the hierarchical organisation of multicellular organisms: from cells to tissues to organs to systems to organisms

be able to identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body

have a basic understanding of the function of muscles

be familiar with the tissues and organs of the human digestive system, including adaptations to function

understand the basic structures and functions of the gas exchange system in humans, including adaptations to function

understand the mechanism of breathing to move air in and out of the lungs, and be able to use a pressure model to explain the movement of gases

understand, in outline, how nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans

be able to identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system

be familiar with the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood

know which part of the body is associated with each sense.

 

Chapter B6 Life on Earth – past, present and future

From your Key Stages 1 to 3 science studies about evolution and biodiversity you should ...

know that there are many different types of organisms living in many different environments, and that there are similarities and differences between all organisms

recognise that living organisms can be grouped and classified in a variety of ways based on commonalities and differences

be able to use classification keys

recognise that living organisms have changed over time and that fossils provide information about organisms that lived millions of years ago

appreciate that organisms live in habitats to which they are adapted

recognise that organisms produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents

know that there is variation between individuals within a species, and that variation can be described as continuous or discontinuous

understand that the variation means some organisms compete more successfully, resulting in natural selection

appreciate that variation, adaptation, competition and natural selection result in the evolution of species

understand that changes in the environment may leave organisms less well adapted to compete successfully and reproduce, which can lead to extinction

be familiar with some of the reasons why it’s important to protect and conserve biodiversity, and some ways of doing so.

 


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